http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Buv32VWWrOo
This Can help With Velocity Vs. Time Graph problems ( Ryan Roopa C period)

Need help reading or figuring out Position vs. Time graphs? (Kristie Kish B-period)

http://zonalandeducation.com/mstm/physics/mechanics/kinematics/xvaVsTime/xVsTime.html

This website will show you what a Pvs.T graph will look like based on a person's bike ride.
Click and drag on the little fellow riding the bike. A position vs. time graph of your motion will be drawn.








Formula to find the slope of a line (Bianca Battaglia B Period)
Formula for the slope of a line
Formula for the slope of a line

    • The slope of a line going through the point (1,2) and the point (4,3) is 1/3.
Graph of the slope of a line
Graph of the slope of a line

    • The slope of a line through the points (3, 4) and (5, 1) is -3/2 because every time that the line goes down by 3(the change in y or the rise) the line moves to the right (the run) by 2.
Picture of the slope of a line
Picture of the slope of a line


Interpretation of Graphs Video (Bianca Battaglia B-Period)

There are three main elements in a graph :
- a vertical axis (the y- axis)
- a horizontal axis (the x-axis),
- at least one line or set ofbars.
To understand a graph, do the following:
1 Read the title of the graph.
2 Read the labels and the range of numbers along the side (the scale or vertical axis), and the information on the bottom (horizontal) axis.
3 Determine what units the graph uses. This information can be found on the axis or in the legend.
4 Look for patterns, groups and differences. (Bianca Battaglia B-Period)






Making Science Graphs and Interpreting Data ( Sean Persaud C Period )



The Independent Variable Time is located on the X axis. The Dependent Variable Distance is located on the Y axis
The Independent Variable Time is located on the X axis. The Dependent Variable Distance is located on the Y axis




external image asterix.gifScientific Graphs:

Most scientific graphs are made as line graphs. There may be times when other types would be appropriate, but they are rare.

The lines on scientific graphs are usually drawn either straight or curved. These "smoothed" lines do not have to touch all the data points, but they should at least get close to most of them. They are called best-fit lines.

In general, scientific graphs are not drawn in connect-the-dot fashon.





Here are two examples of best-fit graph lines.

One is drawn correctly, the other is not.

Best-Fit Line #1
Best-Fit Line #2
Data points on this graph should be represented with a curved line.
Data points on this graph should be represented with a curved line.

Data points on this graph are correctly represented with a straight line.
Data points on this graph are correctly represented with a straight line.

Interpreting Position vs.Time Graphs

(aka Displacement vs. Time Graphs)

slope = velocity

straight diagonal slope = constant velocity

external image U1L3a5.gif

curved slope = acceleration

external image U1L3a10.gif


flat horizontal slope = zero velocity
external image displacement-time-graph1.gif
http://www.physicsclassroom.com/class/1dkin/u1l3a.cfm

Interpreting Velocity vs. Time Graphs

(aka Acceleration Graphs)
slope = acceleration

straight diagonal slope = acceleration
external image U1L4a5.gif


flat horizontal line = constant velocity, zero acceleration
external image U1L4a4.gif


line above x-axis = positive velocity line below x-axis = negative velocity
external image U1L4a7.gif


line going away from 0 = line going towards 0 =
speeding up slowing down
external image U1L4a6.gif
http://www.physicsclassroom.com/class/1dkin/U1L4a.cfm

-Samantha Parente, B Period
Physics classroom explains the aspects of projectile motion that we discussed in class and in our lab. It explains horizontal and vertical velocity and acceleration
http://www.physicsclassroom.com/class/vectors/U3L2b.cfm
http://www.physicsclassroom.com/class/vectors/U3L2c2.cfm
is shown below.
external image u3l2c1.gif
The important concept depicted in the above vector diagram is that the horizontal velocity remains constant during the course of the trajectory and the vertical velocity changes by 9.8 m/s every second. These same two concepts could be depicted by a table illustrating how the x- and y-component of the velocity vary with time.

Time
HorizontalVelocity
VerticalVelocity
0 s
20 m/s, right
0
1 s
20 m/s, right
9.8 m/s, down
2 s
20 m/s, right
19.6 m/s, down
3 s
20 m/s, right
29.4 m/s, down
4 s
20 m/s, right
39.2 m/s, down
5 s
20 m/s, right
49.0 m/s, down

The numerical information in both the diagram and the table above illustrate identical points - a projectile has a vertical acceleration of 9.8 m/s/s, downward and no horizontal acceleration. This is to say that the vertical velocity changes by 9.8 m/s each second and the horizontal velocity never changes. This is indeed consistent with the fact that there is a vertical force acting upon a projectile but no horizontal force. A vertical force causes a vertical acceleration - in this case, an acceleration of 9.8 m/s/s.
(CHRISSY CHERENFANT)